Home » Ask the County Law Librarian – How many cars can you park at your home in Sacramento County?
Law

Ask the County Law Librarian – How many cars can you park at your home in Sacramento County?

saclaw logo

Q. Hello. I am curious on residential parking laws on vehicle ownership. I am a property owner in Sacramento County and inquiring to see if there is a maximum amount of cars one home can park on their property, operating and/or permanently parked in driveway, etc.

Kind regards,

ML
A. The answer, ML, as it is to most legal questions, is “it depends.” There is no set number in the Sacramento County Zoning Code. But, there are circumstances in which having “too many cars” parked in a residential area can be a violation of the County Zoning ordinances.

Section 301-04.8, Yard Parking Restrictions (Amended/Added 7/24/02), applies to all areas zoned for residential use in the County of Sacramento. That ordinance states that the size of the paved area required for vehicle parking or storage “shall be limited to not more than the greater of the following: (1) 40% of the required front or side street yard area; or (2) [t]he paved area leading directly to a carport or enclosed garage; or (3) 400 square feet.”

“Vehicle” is defined as any motorized vehicle, including but not limited to, cars and trucks, trailers, recreational vehicles, farm equipment, motorcycles, boats, dirt bikes, ATV’s, snowmobiles, and dune buggies. The paved areas “shall have a hard surface consisting of asphalt, concrete, or grouted continuous brick or cobblestone,” and “shall be kept in a dust free condition. Dust free surfaces shall consist of, at a minimum, gravel, turf stone, chip seal, paving stones, or silicon coating.”

Section 301-04.7, Storage of Unregistered and/or Inoperable Private Vehicles (Amended 7/24/02), provides that “[s]torage of not more than two (2) unregistered or inoperable vehicles may be allowed outside a fully enclosed building on a parcel of land located in any agricultural, agricultural-residential, residential, interim agricultural holding, interim estate, or interim residential zone, provided the following standards are met: (a) [t]he parcel size is 10,000 square feet, or larger, for the first vehicle and that 5,000 additional square feet is provided for the second vehicle; (b) [v]ehicles are the legal property of the same person/family who resides in the on-site dwelling, as evidenced by a Certificate of Ownership issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles; (c) [v]ehicles shall not be stored in the front yard or side street yard, and (d) [v]ehicles shall be stored behind a six (6) foot high solid wood fence and not be visible from any public street.

Section 301-04.5, Minor Repair and Maintenance of Personal Vehicles, first defines “minor vehicle repair” as including “brake part replacement, minor tune-up, change of oil and filter, repair of flat tire, lubrication and other similar operations. Minor automobile repair or maintenance does not include body or painting work of vehicle or vehicle parts.” The Section goes on to stipulate that “[i]t shall be unlawful for any person to engage in, or permit others to engage in, minor vehicle repair or maintenance in any agricultural, agricultural-residential, residential, interim estate and interim residential zones under any of the following circumstances: (1) [u]sing tools not normally found in a residence; (2) [c]onducted on vehicles registered to persons, not currently residing on the lot or parcel; or (3) [c]onducted outside a fully enclosed garage and resulting in any vehicle being inoperable for a period in excess of twenty-four (24) hours.”

Similarly, Section 301-04.6, Major Vehicle Repair and Maintenance, defines “major vehicle repair and maintenance” to “include any vehicle repair or maintenance other than brake part replacement, minor tune-up, change of oil and filter, repair of flat tires, lubrication and other similar operations which shall be considered ‘minor vehicle repair and maintenance,’” then specifies that “[a]ny body or painting work of vehicles or vehicle parts shall constitute “major vehicle repair,” and that “[i]t shall be unlawful for any person to engage in, or permit others to engage in, major repair or maintenance of vehicles in any agricultural, agricultural-residential, residential, interim agricultural holding, interim estate or interim residential zone.”

Finally, Sections 301-16 and 301-16.5, governing the Storage of Junk and Accumulation of Garbage, Rubbish and Junk, respectively, maintain that “[i]t shall be unlawful for any person to store or keep, or permit others to store or keep, junk, including, but not limited to, scrap metals or other scrap materials on any lot or parcel, or any portion thereof, in any zone other than a heavy industrial zone,” and other than in a junkyard maintained in the Heavy Industrial Land Use Zone, “it shall be unlawful for the owner, lessee or occupant of any lot or parcel of property, or any portion thereof, to keep, maintain and/or store any junk garbage and/or rubbish on such lot or parcel.”

For information on how many cars you can park in your driveway in the City of Sacramento, see my February 27, 2014 column at https://sacramentopress.com/2014/02/27/ask-the-county-law-librarian-how-many-cars-can-you-park-at-a-single-family-home-in-sacramento/.

Hope this helps, ML!

Do you have a question for the County Law Librarian? Just email sacpress@saclaw.org. If your question is selected your answer will appear in next Thursday’s column. Even if your question isn’t selected, though, I will still respond within two weeks.

Coral Henning, Director
@coralh & @saclawlibrarian
www.saclaw.org

Support Local

Topics

Subscribe to Our
Weekly Newsletter

Stay connected to what's happening
in the city
SUBSCRIBE!
We respect your privacy

Subscribe to Sacramento
Press

SUBSCRIBE
close-link
Share via
Copy link