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City, PG&E kicks off Cut Your Cubes Campaign by unveiling the meaning behind the 30-foot cube

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Media Release from the City of Sacramento Office of Media & Communications

 

SACRAMENTO, CA. – The meaning of a large, 30-foot cube was finally revealed today, at Cathedral Square in downtown Sacramento. The giant cube, representing the volume of one metric ton of carbon dioxide gas, was the centerpiece at a kickoff event for the Cut Your Cubes campaign. The campaign is geared to build awareness of how Sacramento residents and businesses can reduce their contribution to climate change by adopting simple changes in lifestyle.

This large cube helps residents visualize the significant volume of greenhouse gases generated by a typical four-person household in one year—which equates to 40 cubes. That means that the average Sacramento resident generates 10 of these cubes per year; five come from vehicle emissions, four from household energy, and one cube is from water-related uses.

“So much of what we do to conserve energy and reduce our carbon footprint happens in small invisible ways,” said Vice Mayor Ashby. “This cube is a visual reminder that each of us has an opportunity to collectively make a big difference for our communities.”

The Cut Your Cubes Campaign, sponsored by PG&E, is part of a larger effort to empower residents to reduce greenhouse gas emissions at a household level. Residents can also join the CoolCalifornia Challenge. The City is one of nine California communities participating in this contest—a statewide competition to motivate households to cut their carbon and promote sustainable communities.

“Climate change means we all have to ‘cut our cubes’,” said Mary Nichols Air Resources Board Chairman. “The good news is that it’s not hard to do—and the CoolCalifornia Challenge shows how simple, everyday solutions can help everyone, and every household, be a creative part of this new cubist movement. "

“Sacramento’s Cut Your Cubes campaign and the statewide CoolCalifornia Challenge can encourage us to cut our carbon emissions and have fun doing it,” said Laurie Litman of 350 Sacramento, a local grassroots group. “We’re proud to be working with the City of Sacramento to find ways to address climate change at the household and community levels.”

Over the past several years, the City has worked on its Climate Action Plan, an award-winning document containing cost‐effective strategies and programs that will help the City better adapt to climate change. This planning document provides a framework and actions to reduce citywide greenhouse gas emissions to 15 percent below 2005 levels by 2020. A key ingredient of the plan is a community empowerment component to encourage residents to adopt sustainable, green practices at home.

“Solar panels and fuel efficient vehicles are lifestyle changes that help us accomplish our goals in big ways, but so are running your dishwasher only when its full, unplugging your toaster when not in use and remembering to turn off lights when you are not home. Every effort matters and we all have an opportunity to make a difference,” Ashby added.

For more information on the Cut Your Cubes campaign, to make a pledge to cut your cubes, how to get involved in the Cool California Challenge, or learn about the benefits to a carbon-lite lifestyle, visit www.cutyourcubes.com.
 

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